© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission.
Made with Xara
Home FAQs: Doodles & Owners: Finding a Puppy:
Fun Stuff: Care & Feeding: Forum & Community Grooming Photo Contest: Training:
Health Information: Resources: Special Stories What's New Working Doods
Contact Us
Adele Lindley of Goldendoodles-Australia bred Hope who was trained as a Hypo Alert Dog for Taking Hope to the Hospital A title like that probably brings thoughts of warm hearted medical and nursing staff doing special things for their patients.  But for one junior doctor, in Australia, taking “Hope” to the hospital is something she does every day.  When Dr Arlene Taylor leaves for work each morning it’s not just her pager/beeper and stethoscope that she takes with her; she is accompanied by her hypoglycaemia alert dog named Hope.  Hope is one of the dogs from the organisation Paws for Diabetics Inc. who place dogs with diabetics, and other people, who experience frequent and severe hypoglycaemic episodes (where the body’s blood sugar level is too low).  Having Hope working alongside means that Arlene is alerted to imminent hypoglycaemic episodes before she experiences any symptoms that might impact on her ability to function.  With this reassurance, Arlene can provide medical care to her patients as reliably as any other junior doctor.  Putting aside her exceptional function as a service dog, Hope  has won the hearts of staff and patients at the hospital with her incredibly cute looks.  It’s not uncommon for people passing this unusual “Doctor-Service Dog Team” to ask exactly what breed the dog is:  Hope is a Groodle or Golden Doodle (which is a golden retriever crossed with a standard poodle).  While Hope is the first Groodle to enter the Paws for Diabetics Inc program, her suitability to the role as a hypoglycaemia alert dog is unquestionable.  Hope’s loyalty and high intellect (common features of Groodles) make her an ideal candidate for the role.  Her hypoallergenic coat minimises any questions raised about her suitability as a service dog for a doctor working in a hospital.  So how does being a doctor with a service dog work?   It’s not unusual for Staff working on the same wards as Arlene to hear the occasional bark when Hope alerts. While this isn’t Hope’s primary alerting behaviour (she would normally lick or nibble Arlene’s hands) it happens at least once a day when Arlene’s hands are occupied completing her own work.  Keeping a supply of healthy snacks on hand is essential, and Arlene knows better than most doctors the truth behind the saying “If you don’t look after yourself you won’t be able to look after anyone else”.  From the perspective of Arlene’s patients, Hope’s winning personality and attractiveness make her a popular addition to the treating team; in fact, many patients report feeling better and are discharged home earlier than planned after a visit from this unique team.    For Arlene, being the doctor with the dog places her in the spotlight on a regular basis:  Hope and Arlene are the first Doctor-Service Dog team in Australia.  Being the first to do anything always has its challenges.  However, having Hope at work means Arlene can get through a day without becoming incapacitated from a hypoglycaemic episode; giving her the chance to continue in her medical career and work towards her goal of becoming a combined clinical pharmacologist/clinical toxicologist.  So, in so many ways Hope lives up to her name each day when she goes to the hospital.  Hope was bred by Adele Lindley of Goldendoodles-Australia and trained as a Hypo Alert Dog for Paws for Diabetics, Inc. Paws for Diabetics Inc Paws for Diabetics Inc is a charitable non-profit organisation of dedicated volunteers, involved in the training and placement of diabetic alert dogs. For more information on Paws for Diabetics Inc. and how you can help: http://www.pfd.org.au/
© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission
Made with Xara
HOME FAQs FINDING A PUPPY Doodles & Owners Fun Stuff Care & Feeding Forum & Community Grooming Photo Contest Resources Health Info Training Special Stories What's New Working Doods Contact Us
Adele Lindley of Goldendoodles-Australia bred Hope who was trained as a Hypo Alert Dog for Taking Hope to the Hospital A title like that probably brings thoughts of warm hearted medical and nursing staff doing special things for their patients.  But for one junior doctor, in Australia, taking “Hope” to the hospital is something she does every day.  When Dr Arlene Taylor leaves for work each morning it’s not just her pager/beeper and stethoscope that she takes with her; she is accompanied by her hypoglycaemia alert dog named Hope.  Hope is one of the dogs from the organisation Paws for Diabetics Inc. who place dogs with diabetics, and other people, who experience frequent and severe hypoglycaemic episodes (where the body’s blood sugar level is too low).  Having Hope working alongside means that Arlene is alerted to imminent hypoglycaemic episodes before she experiences any symptoms that might impact on her ability to function.  With this reassurance, Arlene can provide medical care to her patients as reliably as any other junior doctor.  Putting aside her exceptional function as a service dog, Hope has won the hearts of staff and patients at the hospital with her incredibly cute looks.  It’s not uncommon for people passing this unusual “Doctor- Service Dog Team” to ask exactly what breed the dog is:  Hope is a Groodle or Golden Doodle (which is a golden retriever crossed with a standard poodle).  While Hope is the first Groodle to enter the Paws for Diabetics Inc program, her suitability to the role as a hypoglycaemia alert dog is unquestionable.  Hope’s loyalty and high intellect (common features of Groodles) make her an ideal candidate for the role.  Her hypoallergenic coat minimises any questions raised about her suitability as a service dog for a doctor working in a hospital.  So how does being a doctor with a service dog work?   It’s not unusual for Staff working on the same wards as Arlene to hear the occasional bark when Hope alerts. While this isn’t Hope’s primary alerting behaviour (she would normally lick or nibble Arlene’s hands) it happens at least once a day when Arlene’s hands are occupied completing her own work.  Keeping a supply of healthy snacks on hand is essential, and Arlene knows better than most doctors the truth behind the saying “If you don’t look after yourself you won’t be able to look after anyone else”.  From the perspective of Arlene’s patients, Hope’s winning personality and attractiveness make her a popular addition to the treating team; in fact, many patients report feeling better and are discharged home earlier than planned after a visit from this unique team.    For Arlene, being the doctor with the dog places her in the spotlight on a regular basis:  Hope and Arlene are the first Doctor-Service Dog team in Australia.  Being the first to do anything always has its challenges.  However, having Hope at work means Arlene can get through a day without becoming incapacitated from a hypoglycaemic episode; giving her the chance to continue in her medical career and work towards her goal of becoming a combined clinical pharmacologist/clinical toxicologist.  So, in so many ways Hope lives up to her name each day when she goes to the hospital.  Hope was bred by Adele Lindley of Goldendoodles- Australia and trained as a Hypo Alert Dog for Paws for Diabetics, Inc. Paws for Diabetics Inc Paws for Diabetics Inc is a charitable non-profit organisation of dedicated volunteers, involved in the training and placement of diabetic alert dogs. For more information on Paws for Diabetics Inc. and how you can help: http://www.pfd.org.au/