© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission.

IF THE TICK HAS NOT YET ATTACHED ITSELF

Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and let it stay on the insect for 15-20 seconds, after which the tick will come out on it's own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.

IF THE TICK HAS ATTACHED ITSELF

Twofold attack - 1)  One is to spray the yard & the dogs area with flea & tick stuff.  But when spraying, the coverage has to be complete -- either use granules of the chemical, a sprayer on the garden hose or a field sprayer. If there are cedar trees, the trees need sprayed.  Our biggest issue is ticks dropping onto the dogs & people from cedar trees.  (personal note - We normally use the chemical "Sevin" as we also use it to kill other insects on our hay pastures.) 2)  The second method (which MUST be done) is to treat the dog. We use several methods of treating the dogs. •  First, we use a tick treatment  (personal note - we use Frontline Plus) EVERY month year round. •  Second, we wash the dogs with flea & tick preventative shampoo every week during the spring, summer & fall months. •  Third, we treat their sleeping areas & the kennels with a chemical safe for them & keep them out of the area until it dries. Even with all of these preventative steps we still end up removing a few ticks each week. They are usually already dead though. The only safe way to remove a tick is using long handled tweezers or special tick tweezers, grasp the tick at the very front -- as close to the dog's skin as possible -- and firmly pull the tick straight out. You need to avoid pulling or crushing the soft area of the tick as it will often cause the tick's guts to squeeze out, exposing the dog & the person to any infected fluids. There are a number of tick borne diseases, including: Lyme; Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever; STARI; Tick-borne relapsing fever; and HGE. You can learn more about tick-borne diseases here: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/list_tickborne.htm and all insect borne diseases at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/index.htm. A special thanks to Marcee Coonrod  for putting together this information for the site.

Tick Control

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The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues.
© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission
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The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues.

Tick Control

IF THE TICK HAS NOT YET ATTACHED

ITSELF

Apply a glob of liquid soap to a cotton ball. Cover the tick with the soap-soaked cotton ball and let it stay on the insect for 15-20 seconds, after which the tick will come out on it's own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you lift it away.

IF THE TICK HAS ATTACHED ITSELF

Twofold attack - 1)  One is to spray the yard & the dogs area with flea & tick stuff.  But when spraying, the coverage has to be complete -- either use granules of the chemical, a sprayer on the garden hose or a field sprayer. If there are cedar trees, the trees need sprayed.  Our biggest issue is ticks dropping onto the dogs & people from cedar trees.  (personal note - We normally use the chemical "Sevin" as we also use it to kill other insects on our hay pastures.) 2)  The second method (which MUST be done) is to treat the dog. We use several methods of treating the dogs. •  First, we use a tick treatment  (personal note - we use Frontline Plus) EVERY month year round. •  Second, we wash the dogs with flea & tick preventative shampoo every week during the spring, summer & fall months. •  Third, we treat their sleeping areas & the kennels with a chemical safe for them & keep them out of the area until it dries. Even with all of these preventative steps we still end up removing a few ticks each week. They are usually already dead though. The only safe way to remove a tick is using long handled tweezers or special tick tweezers, grasp the tick at the very front -- as close to the dog's skin as possible - - and firmly pull the tick straight out. You need to avoid pulling or crushing the soft area of the tick as it will often cause the tick's guts to squeeze out, exposing the dog & the person to any infected fluids. There are a number of tick borne diseases, including: Lyme; Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever; STARI; Tick-borne relapsing fever; and HGE. You can learn more about tick-borne diseases here: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/list_tickborne.htm and all insect borne diseases at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/index.htm. A special thanks to Marcee Coonrod  for putting together this information for the site.