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Canine Wisdom

The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues.
JUST A DOG Written by an unknown Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. From the Therapy Dog Inc. News Magazine From time to time, people tell me, "lighten up, it's just a dog," or, "that's a lot of money for just a dog." They don't understand the distance traveled, the time spent or the costs involved for “just a dog." Some of my proudest moments have come about with "just a dog." Many hours have passed and my only company was "just a dog," but I did not once feel slighted. Some of my saddest moments have been brought about by "just a dog," and in those days of darkness, the gentle touch of "just a dog" gave me comfort and reason to overcome the day. If you, too, think it's "just a dog," then you will probably understand phrases like "just a friend," "just a sunrise," or "just a promise." "Just a dog" brings into my life the very essence of friendship, trust, and pure unbridled joy. "Just a dog" brings out the compassion and patience that make me a better person. Because of "just a dog", I will rise early, take long walks and look longingly to the future. So for me and folks like me, it's not "just a dog" but an embodiment of all the hopes and dreams of the future, the fond memories of the past, and the pure joy of the moment. "Just a dog" brings out what's good in me and diverts my thoughts away from myself and the worries of the day. I hope that someday they can understand that it's not "just a dog", but the thing that gives me humanity and keeps me from being "just a man or woman." So the next time you hear the phrase "just a dog" just smile... because they "just don't understand." I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAY by Janine Allen Her eyes met mine as she walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to help her. I wagged my tail, not too exuberantly, so she wouldn’t be afraid. As she stopped at my kennel I blocked her view from a little accident I had in the back of my cage. I didn’t want her to know that I hadn’t been walked today. Sometimes the overworked shelter keepers get too busy and I didn’t want her to think poorly of them. As she read my kennel card I hoped that she wouldn’t feel sad about my past. I only have the future to look forward to and want to make a difference in someone’s life. She got down on her knees and made little kissy sounds at me. I shoved my shoulder and side of my head up against the bars to comfort her. Gentle fingertips caressed my neck; she was desperate for companionship. A tear fell down her cheek and I raised my paw to assure her that all would be well. Soon my kennel door opened and her smile was so bright that I instantly jumped into her arms. I would promise to keep her safe. I would promise to always be by her side. I would promise to do everything I could to see that radiant smile and sparkle in her eyes. I was so fortunate that she came down my corridor. So many more are out there who haven’t walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. I rescued a human today. Source: http://rescuemedog.org/dog-blog/i-rescued-a-human-today-by-janine-allen/ Written by Janine Allen CPDT, Rescue Me Dog's professional dog trainer. Janine's passion is working with people and their dogs. She provides demonstrations for those who have adopted shelter dogs, lends email support to adopted dog owners that need information beyond our Training Support Pages, and aids shelter staff and volunteers in understanding dog behavior to increase their adoptability. Copyright 2009 Rescue Me Dog; www.rescuemedog.org

What a dog could teach us :

Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Remember, if a dog was the teacher you would learn things like: •  When loved ones come home, always run to greet them. •  Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride. •  Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy. •  Take naps. •  Stretch before rising. •  Run, romp, and play daily. •  Thrive on attention and let people touch you. •  Avoid biting when a simple growl will do. •  On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass. •  On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree. •  When you're happy, dance around and wag your entire body. •  Delight in the simple joy of a long walk. •  Eat with gusto and enthusiasm. Stop when you have had enough. •  Be loyal. •  Never pretend to be something you're not. •  If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it. •  When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently. •  Being always grateful for each new day and for the blessing of you. •  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT OF EVERY DAY Reprinted from email circulated September 2007
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© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission
Made with Xara
.
HOME FAQs FINDING A PUPPY Doodles & Owners Photo Contest Resources Health Info Training Special Stories What's New Working Doods Contact Us
The information contained on this site is in no way intended to replace that of proper veterinary advice, diagnosis or treatment. It is meant to provide resource, so that we can better understand canine health related issues.
Fun Stuff Care & Feeding Forum & Community Grooming

Canine Wisdom

JUST A DOG Written by an unknown Doctor of Veterinary Medicine. From the Therapy Dog Inc. News Magazine From time to time, people tell me, "lighten up, it's just a dog," or, "that's a lot of money for just a dog." They don't understand the distance traveled, the time spent or the costs involved for “just a dog." Some of my proudest moments have come about with "just a dog." Many hours have passed and my only company was "just a dog," but I did not once feel slighted. Some of my saddest moments have been brought about by "just a dog," and in those days of darkness, the gentle touch of "just a dog" gave me comfort and reason to overcome the day. If you, too, think it's "just a dog," then you will probably understand phrases like "just a friend," "just a sunrise," or "just a promise." "Just a dog" brings into my life the very essence of friendship, trust, and pure unbridled joy. "Just a dog" brings out the compassion and patience that make me a better person. Because of "just a dog", I will rise early, take long walks and look longingly to the future. So for me and folks like me, it's not "just a dog" but an embodiment of all the hopes and dreams of the future, the fond memories of the past, and the pure joy of the moment. "Just a dog" brings out what's good in me and diverts my thoughts away from myself and the worries of the day. I hope that someday they can understand that it's not "just a dog", but the thing that gives me humanity and keeps me from being "just a man or woman." So the next time you hear the phrase "just a dog" just smile... because they "just don't understand." I RESCUED A HUMAN TODAY by Janine Allen Her eyes met mine as she walked down the corridor peering apprehensively into the kennels. I felt her need instantly and knew I had to help her. I wagged my tail, not too exuberantly, so she wouldn’t be afraid. As she stopped at my kennel I blocked her view from a little accident I had in the back of my cage. I didn’t want her to know that I hadn’t been walked today. Sometimes the overworked shelter keepers get too busy and I didn’t want her to think poorly of them. As she read my kennel card I hoped that she wouldn’t feel sad about my past. I only have the future to look forward to and want to make a difference in someone’s life. She got down on her knees and made little kissy sounds at me. I shoved my shoulder and side of my head up against the bars to comfort her. Gentle fingertips caressed my neck; she was desperate for companionship. A tear fell down her cheek and I raised my paw to assure her that all would be well. Soon my kennel door opened and her smile was so bright that I instantly jumped into her arms. I would promise to keep her safe. I would promise to always be by her side. I would promise to do everything I could to see that radiant smile and sparkle in her eyes. I was so fortunate that she came down my corridor. So many more are out there who haven’t walked the corridors. So many more to be saved. At least I could save one. I rescued a human today. Source: http://rescuemedog.org/dog-blog/i-rescued-a-human-today-by- janine-allen/ Written by Janine Allen CPDT, Rescue Me Dog's professional dog trainer. Janine's passion is working with people and their dogs. She provides demonstrations for those who have adopted shelter dogs, lends email support to adopted dog owners that need information beyond our Training Support Pages, and aids shelter staff and volunteers in understanding dog behavior to increase their adoptability. Copyright 2009 Rescue Me Dog; www.rescuemedog.org

What a dog could teach us :

Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Remember, if a dog was the teacher you would learn things like: •  When loved ones come home, always run to greet them. •  Never pass up the opportunity to go for a joyride. •  Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy. •  Take naps. •  Stretch before rising. •  Run, romp, and play daily. •  Thrive on attention and let people touch you. •  Avoid biting when a simple growl will do. •  On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass. •  On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree. •  When you're happy, dance around and wag your entire body. •  Delight in the simple joy of a long walk. •  Eat with gusto and enthusiasm. Stop when you have had enough. •  Be loyal. •  Never pretend to be something you're not. •  If what you want lies buried, dig until you find it. •  When someone is having a bad day, be silent, sit close by and nuzzle them gently. •  Being always grateful for each new day and for the blessing of you. •  ENJOY EVERY MOMENT OF EVERY DAY Reprinted from email circulated September 2007