© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission.

DOODS & GENERATIONS   

First Generation Labradoodles  -  F1

A first generation hybrid Labradoodle is the product of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle.  The term 'Labradoodle' was coined by Wally Conron of the Australian Guide Dog Association, when he first bred these hybrids as allergy friendly service dogs.  The AGDA still uses first generation Labradoodles upon demand to this day. As first generation hybrids, these dogs have the added health benefits associated to Hybrid Vigour.  This is a phenomenon in animal breeding referring to the fact that the first cross between two unrelated purebred lines is healthier and grows better than either parent line.   Coat Maintenance:  Low care Coat Description: Coat grows to about 2-3 inches in length and requires occasional combing.  Coats are often hair coats, and others can have wavy or curly coats. Shedding:  light to nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  usually successful in families with mild allergies.  When a family has moderate to severe allergies, a backcross Dood is recommended.

First Generation Backcross Labradoodles - F1b

A backcross pup is the result of a hybrid bred back to one of its breeds of origin.   From a genetic standpoint a backcross pup is a first generation cross.  As breeders are breeding towards nonshedding and allergy friendliness, a backcross Labradoodle is generally the product of a Labradoodle bred to a Poodle. The resulting dog is, on average, 1/4 Labrador Retriever and 3/4 Poodle. Although there is less vigour in this crossing than in the original hybrid,  the first generation backcross still is close enough in the breeding tree to benefit from hybrid vigour.  With each successive generation vigour is lost. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: Coat continues to grow in length and requires combing and occasional grooming.  It is usually thicker and curlier than a first generation Labradoodle with a wavy or curly coat. Shedding:  very light to nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  Backcross Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies.

Multi-generation Labradoodles

Technically a multigeneration Labradoodle should be the result of generations of Labradoodle to Labradoodle breeding, but in practice backcrosses and poodles are also used in the early generations. When multigeneration Labradoodles were first introduced to North American breeders, they were given a Lab-Poodle breeding program as the breeding model for Labradoodles, which suggesteded that Poodles could be reintroduced into the early generations. This breeding program allowed breeding to poodles for the first four generations - which is why in some older lines of multigen dogs, 'there is a lot of poodle in the doodle'.  Poodles are less expensive,  they make shedding lines more nonshed, and they allow the introduction of some popular new colours such as red and parti.  Good breeders are selective about adding only a modest amount of poodle in the early generations. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: Coat continues to grow in length and requires combing and occasional grooming.  It is thicker  than a first generation Labradoodle and can have a curly, fleece or wavy coat type. Shedding:  almost all nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  Multigeneration Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies.

Australian Labradoodles

In 2004, the name Australian Labradoodle was used to describe the lines of multigeneration Labradoodles with long pedigrees, some dating back to the two kennels in Australia who started breeding them in the early 1990's.  It was later announced was that there were in fact six breeds used in the breeding program; Poodle, Labrador Retriever, Irish Water Spaniel, Curly Coat Retriever, American Cocker Spaniel, English Cocker Spaniel. The Curly Coated Retriever experiment was a failure and those lines were abandoned.  Only two Irish Water Spaniels were used, and only one time each.  This left the main contributors as : Labrador, Poodle and American & English Cocker Spaniels. Multigeneration Labradoodles from Australia started to take off in North America in the late 1990's.  Now there are a large number of breeders in North America and in Australia who own breeding dogs from these lines.  They are working together to push for higher standards in health testing, to broaden the genetic foundation and to better the breed as a whole. The Labradoodle Association of Australia (LAA) is the founding parent body of the Australian Labradoodle.  It is their vision to work with the Australian National Kennel Club (ANKC) towards breed recognition in Australia - a process which takes decades of breeding towards conformity. The Australian Labradoodle Association of America (ALAA) protects the welfare of the Labradoodle and Australian Labradoodle breeds. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: They have wool, 'new wool', fleece or hair coats which continue to grow in length and require combing and occasional grooming.  Wool coats are curly and poodly in texture.  The 'new wool' has a more relaxed and softer curl.  A fleece coat has a relaxed curl and is softer than wool coats.  Hair coats are rare and are flat, shedding and not allergy friendly. Shedding:  almost all nonshed Allergy Friendliness:  Australian Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies. For more information see our page on the Australian Labradoodle (top photo courtesy of Timshell Farm)
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© Copyright Goldendoodles.com 2001.  All rights reserved.  You may not copy or otherwise use anything on this site without our written permission

DOODS &

GENERATIONS   

First Generation

Labradoodles  -  F1

A first generation hybrid Labradoodle is the product of a Labrador Retriever and a Poodle.  The term 'Labradoodle' was coined by Wally Conron of the Australian Guide Dog Association, when he first bred these hybrids as allergy friendly service dogs.  The AGDA still uses first generation Labradoodles upon demand to this day. As first generation hybrids, these dogs have the added health benefits associated to Hybrid Vigour.  This is a phenomenon in animal breeding referring to the fact that the first cross between two unrelated purebred lines is healthier and grows better than either parent line.   Coat Maintenance:  Low care Coat Description: Coat grows to about 2-3 inches in length and requires occasional combing.  Coats are often hair coats, and others can have wavy or curly coats. Shedding:  light to nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  usually successful in families with mild allergies.  When a family has moderate to severe allergies, a backcross Dood is recommended.

First Generation

Backcross

Labradoodles - F1b

A backcross pup is the result of a hybrid bred back to one of its breeds of origin.   From a genetic standpoint a backcross pup is a first generation cross.  As breeders are breeding towards nonshedding and allergy friendliness, a backcross Labradoodle is generally the product of a Labradoodle bred to a Poodle. The resulting dog is, on average, 1/4 Labrador Retriever and 3/4 Poodle. Although there is less vigour in this crossing than in the original hybrid,  the first generation backcross still is close enough in the breeding tree to benefit from hybrid vigour.  With each successive generation vigour is lost. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: Coat continues to grow in length and requires combing and occasional grooming.  It is usually thicker and curlier than a first generation Labradoodle with a wavy or curly coat. Shedding:  very light to nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  Backcross Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies.

Multi-generation

Labradoodles

Technically a multigeneration Labradoodle should be the result of generations of Labradoodle to Labradoodle breeding, but in practice backcrosses and poodles are also used in the early generations. When multigeneration Labradoodles were first introduced to North American breeders, they were given a Lab-Poodle breeding program as the breeding model for Labradoodles, which suggesteded that Poodles could be reintroduced into the early generations. This breeding program allowed breeding to poodles for the first four generations - which is why in some older lines of multigen dogs, 'there is a lot of poodle in the doodle'.  Poodles are less expensive,  they make shedding lines more nonshed, and they allow the introduction of some popular new colours such as red and parti.  Good breeders are selective about adding only a modest amount of poodle in the early generations. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: Coat continues to grow in length and requires combing and occasional grooming.  It is thicker  than a first generation Labradoodle and can have a curly, fleece or wavy coat type. Shedding:  almost all nonshed (see the stats in the Dood Database) Allergy Friendliness:  Multigeneration Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies.

Australian

Labradoodles

In 2004, the name Australian Labradoodle was used to describe the lines of multigeneration Labradoodles with long pedigrees, some dating back to the two kennels in Australia who started breeding them in the early 1990's.  It was later announced was that there were in fact six breeds used in the breeding program; Poodle, Labrador Retriever, Irish Water Spaniel, Curly Coat Retriever, American Cocker Spaniel, English Cocker Spaniel. The Curly Coated Retriever experiment was a failure and those lines were abandoned.  Only two Irish Water Spaniels were used, and only one time each.  This left the main contributors as : Labrador, Poodle and American & English Cocker Spaniels. Multigeneration Labradoodles from Australia started to take off in North America in the late 1990's.  Now there are a large number of breeders in North America and in Australia who own breeding dogs from these lines.  They are working together to push for higher standards in health testing, to broaden the genetic foundation and to better the breed as a whole. The Labradoodle Association of Australia (LAA) is the founding parent body of the Australian Labradoodle.  It is their vision to work with the Australian National Kennel Club (ANKC) towards breed recognition in Australia - a process which takes decades of breeding towards conformity. The Australian Labradoodle Association of America (ALAA) protects the welfare of the Labradoodle and Australian Labradoodle breeds. Coat Maintenance:  moderate to high care Coat Description: They have wool, 'new wool', fleece or hair coats which continue to grow in length and require combing and occasional grooming.  Wool coats are curly and poodly in texture.  The 'new wool' has a more relaxed and softer curl.  A fleece coat has a relaxed curl and is softer than wool coats.  Hair coats are rare and are flat, shedding and not allergy friendly. Shedding:  almost all nonshed Allergy Friendliness:  Australian Labradoodles are recommended for families with moderate to severe allergies. For more information see our page on the Australian Labradoodle (top photo courtesy of Timshell Farm)
Page 1 Page 2

FAQs

Mountain View Labradoodles
Lily
West Orchard Labradoodles
Burkhart’s Kennels
HOME FAQs FINDING A PUPPY Doodles & Owners Fun Stuff Care & Feeding Forum & Community Grooming Photo Contest Resources Health Info Training Special Stories What's New Working Doods Contact Us

SECTION